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Located in Mid Wales, Powys is made up by the counties of Montgomeryshire, Radnorshire, a majority of Brecknockshire, and part of Denbighshire and is the largest county in Wales in terms of land area. The geographical makeup of Powys is a very mountainous terrain, which can make automotive travel difficult, but also provides many sight-seeing opportunities for those who consider themselves outdoor enthusiasts.

Outdoor Sights

There are many outdoor sights to see in Powys - some natural, some manmade. One of the most popular viewing attractions in the area is Elan Valley, a local dam. This will interest sight-seers, architectural fans, and nature lovers. In addition to viewing the dam itself, visitors can tour the nearby countryside and take in the beautiful sights and sounds of the surrounding area. There is also a cafe available on the premises of the dam that serves home style dishes at reasonable prices.

Another popular spot in the area is Brecon Beacons National Park. At this park, sight-seers can see Pen-y-Fan, the highest mountain in Wales, which towers over the rest of the park. Another popular sight to see at the park is the Monmouthshire and Brecon Canal, a forty-two mile long waterway where guided tours are available.

Penderyn Distillery is also located on the premises of Brecon Beacons National Park and is one of the smallest distilleries in the world. Visitors to the distillery can learn about the process behind whisky making and actually partake in a whisky making class, as well as sample some of the distillery’s products.

Wildlife and Nature Preserves

In addition to the multitude of natural sites to see in Powys, there are also several wildlife preserves throughout the area. One of the most popular destinations for the wildlife sight-seeing is Falconry Experience Wales. Dedicated to nature conservation, Falconry Experience Wales offers visitors the opportunity to see beautiful birds of prey in a variety of different falconry demonstrations and guided tours.

Ynys Hir Wildlife Reserve is also a great place for bird-watching and also offers a variety of trails for visitors to explore where they can see local wildlife as well as dens and hides. Patrons can also choose to pack their own picnic and eat on the premises.

Another popular bird-watching spot is the Red Kite Feeding Station at the previously mentioned Brecon Beacons National Park. Here, bird-watchers can sit in specially built hides and observe many different species of predatory birds feeding including Red Kites, Buzzards, and Ravens.

It’s obvious that nature and wildlife sites are some of the chief tourist attractions in Powys and there is no shortage of interactive and observational opportunities for visitors to enjoy.